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Christian Life, Family, Inspiration

Devotional 6: Lesson Learned on a Family Roadtrip

My family and I were in Georgia for the Fourth of July holiday, visiting my mom, dad, and one of my older brothers. The 13-hour drive to see them is always an opportunity to reflect on life and where I’m going.

Long drives can do that, you know.

As we pass other vehicles on the road, destinations and pit stops, it’s a reminder that we’re all on this journey, a journey that is oftentimes rife with the proverbial bumper-to-bumper traffic, detours, bumps in the road, and near-death collisions. Oh, how unexpected life can be.

Long road trips are also a lot of fun. My two children in the back seat, with their endless appetites, chomp away at snacks that I pack for the family. They sometimes fight over who gets to use the electronic device first. Every once in a while, we’ll all join voices and sing one of our favorite gospel songs by Tasha Cobbs, sounding so woefully off-key.

Yes, family road trips are a reminder that life is not all good, but not all bad either.

My dear husband drives about 90 percent of the way. I take a couple of naps during our journey. Feeling refreshed, I ask if he needs a break, and more than often he says no. I offer again as we near Atlanta, which is usually when his fatigue really starts to set in.

As I get behind the wheel, adjust the mirrors and seat, I can’t help but think about how blessed this life is.

For one, it’s a privilege to visit my mom and dad. Though they are getting up and age, and their bodies show signs of wear-and-tear, they are still on this side of heaven. For that, I am grateful.

Family. It warms my heart to be in their presence.

I get a feeling of wholeness when we make the long trek to Georgia from Washington, DC.

Sure, we could take trips to more exotic locations or locales in the U.S. where the air smells different and new. I’m sure the kids wouldn’t mind an amusement park now and then, instead of the Georgia countryside. But, no, Disneyworld can wait.

Let’s be honest. Life is so fleeting.

James, Jesus’ brother and a leader in the church, said it best:

Now listen, you who say, “Today or tomorrow we will go to this or that city, spend a year there, carry on business and make money.” Why, you do not even know what will happen tomorrow. What is your life? You are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes. Instead, you ought to say, “If this is the Lord’s will, we will live and do this or that.”

No matter how long we live, this life is a blink of an eye compared to eternity.

I am humbly aware that my shelf-life here on earth is short. In fact, it is not even in my hands. My life, your life, is in God’s hands.

Being aware of my humanity compels me to listen to the Holy Spirit, which guides me and presses upon my heart the righteous thing to do.

It is that soft whisper that compels me to go see my family whenever there’s a chance. In doing so, I submit to the Lord’s will.

And I am all the more better for it. Time with family, in the place we call our roots, refreshes the soul.

As James suggested, tomorrow is not promised. Our earthly lifetime is, indeed, short. Therefore, let’s not put off tomorrow, what we could do today.

Here are some simple ideas from my own life:

  1. Spend quality time with a loved one.
  2. Call a friend/family member and tell them you love them.
  3. Forgive a wrong.
  4. Speak honestly to someone who needs it.
  5. Give a much-needed hug.
  6. Let go of regret.
  7. Kick a bad habit.
  8. Try something new.
  9. Get real with God and turn away from a sin/fear/doubt/insecurity/bitterness, etc.
  10. Serve someone in need.

What are you putting off tomorrow, that you could be doing today?

Faith, Family, Inspiration, Prayer

Devotional 2: God’s Hidden Messages

Now that my daughter, who recently turned 9, is tall enough to reach the mirror over the bathroom sink, she often spends extra minutes after her shower standing in the steam doodling on a foggy mirror. She writes messages attempting to make contact with anyone who will notice her scribbles, which can only be seen from a certain angle — a slant to the left and a slant to the right, usually.

Her most recent message appeared to be meant for my husband. I love you Daddy, she wrote.

I don’t think she realized it yet, but he recently replied back to her: I love you very much. Daddy

God often communicates in much the same way to his devoted daughters, doesn’t He?

He sends hidden messages to his daughter throughout the day, weeks, months and years, letting his devoted daughter know that she is seen, heard, worthy and loved by Him.

These divine messages, however, require a certain spiritual outlook in order to be seen. Much like the tilting of the head to decipher a note on the foggy mirror, you must angle yourself, rooted in scripture, to discover God’s notes of encouragement and admonishment.

Indeed, the messages aren’t always obvious; hence, why I call them ‘hidden.’ They are embedded in the holes and corners of life, indiscernible by the hurried and worried disciple.

The messages are delicately inscribed throughout the mundane, everyday routines of life, too. Much like the words composed on a foggy bathroom mirror. They can only be seen by the keen, discerning eye.

Do you hear His call?

In a whisper he calls out to her. His daughter need only listen and watch. Listen and watch.

It is the message of hope when you get word that your best friend’s cancer has gone into remission.

I hear your prayers, says the Lord.

It is the message of unconditional love, when your child tackles you from behind and with tightly wrapped arms says, ‘I love you, Mommy.’

As do I, says the King.

It is the message of wholeness when he binds up your wounds and mends your broken heart.

My arms are not too short to save, He proclaims.

His voice is also hidden in a message of grace, when you fall short of His glory but vow to walk in obedience next time, and the time after that.

I see you, God says, and I will stoop down from my heavenly throne to make you great.

Dear sister, God’s messages are nested in all sorts of places in your life. You need only wait in holy expectation.

It is a daughter’s resolve to reach the Holy One, connecting with Him through the messages of a righteous life lived — indeed, her devotion — that compels the Good Father to take notice, and to respond.

Whether in the Bible or in the nooks and crannies of your life, how is God speaking to you?

Prayer

Dear Lord, you are a good, good Father. Help me to have eyes to see and ears to hear when you are speaking to me. Teach me, O God, how to discern your whispers even when the world calls out in its loud, distracting voice. Give me the strength and resolve to be obedient to your call. And grant me peace and contentment as I walk with you all the days of my life.