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Bible Scriptures, Christian Lifestyle, Devotionals, Faith

Devotional 12: Have Fear? Seek God.

As I sat down at my computer to craft this week’s blog post, I was torn about what to write about.

  • Do I talk about my recent gardening projects and use it as a metaphor for how God cultivates us to grow in Him?
  • Do I share about a moment that almost cost me my faith?
  • Do I pull back the curtain of my life and share about the events that led me to Christ?
  • Do I illustrate our inclination to manipulate and control our will and way using a funny story about my kids?

Those are certainly topics on my writing to-do list, I thought, but what struck me in that moment is the realization that we are always choosing which face to show each day.

Sometimes it is deeply personal. At others, we hold our heart close.

That’s, of course, with other people.

But are we that way with God? I would argue that we are. At least sometimes.

Yet, no matter what is going on in our lives, our attitudes and actions, whatever is on our hearts, should be readily offered on the alter of the Lord.

Through prayer, we can share our deepest hurts, our ugliest decisions, our self-serving motives, and our most unworthy human deficits.

Why? Because he truly cares for us.

I tell people often: God wants to hear from you.

Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you. 1 Peter 5:7 (NIV)

Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? And not one of them will fall to the ground apart from your Father. But even the hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not, therefore; you are of more value than many sparrows. Matthew 10: 29-30 (ESV)

The pervasiveness of FEAR

One raw emotion that recurs throughout the Bible is Fear.

In both the Old and New Testaments, God promises us freedom from fear that arises in our daily lives.

The fear you experience — fear of losing a loved one, fear of losing income/job, fear of declining health, fear of unexpected news, fear of never meeting your potential — plagues even the faithful. And for some of you reading this, it surfaces almost daily. 

Whatever the fear, God promises to free us of it and what a great promise that is!

This freedom comes from trusting in God who protects and helps us.

Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and staff, they comfort me. Psalm 23:4 (ESV)

In righteousness you shall be established; you shall be far from oppression, for you shall not fear; and from terror, for it shall not come near you. Isaiah 54:14 (ESV)

The New Testament teaches that perfect loves drives out fear. (1 John 4:18)

Indeed, as Christians, we are no longer slaves of fear, for Christ has given us not a spirit of timidity or to shrink back from the challenges life brings us, but a spirit to fight — a spirt of power, of love and of self-control, according to 2 Timothy 1:7.

An invitation to ‘not be afraid’

The expression “fear not,” which is also translated “do not fear” or “do not be afraid,” is an invitation to confidence and trust that God repeatedly offers His people. It is used at least 15 times in the Bible as an expression of comfort, in fact.

Do not be afraid when a man becomes rich, when the glory of his house increases. Psalm 49:16 (ESV)

And now my daughter, do not fear. I will do for you all that you ask, for all my fellow townsmen know that you are a worthy woman. Ruth 3: 11 (ESV)

It is clear from God’s Word, that he welcomes us to a life that is marked by transparency and raw emotion.

I referenced alters earlier.

Our spiritual ancestors used alters to offer the Lord sacrifices, but it also represents a proper worship of God.

When we offer this proper sacrifice to God — when we’re transformed in our actions and mind, and obedient to Christ — it is pleasing to Him. If our sacrifice is acceptable to God it is known to manifest blessings and covenant renewal in Exodus 20:24.

In every place where I cause my name to be remembered I will come to you and bless you.

When we doubt and feel the tremors that are brought on by an earthquake of fear, we can also call on the Lord and remember Him, who is readily available and brings us comfort and peace during our times of trouble.

Dear friend, surrender that which is plaguing you today. Take off the mask. Let down your guard. And let the Lord come to you with all his holiness and might.

What is plaguing you in this time of your life? How is it interfering with your proper worship of God?

Reference: Butler, Trent C. (1991) Holman Bible Dictionary, 481-482.

Bible Scriptures, Faith, Family, Uncategorized

Devotional 10: How to Raise Confident Kids

I am regularly asking parents about their child-rearing techniques.

It’s not that I think I’m bad at parenting, but I love gleaning parenting ideas from other moms, dads and other caregivers.

I understand that there is no one-sized-fits-all approach for raising kids.

But among the Christian parents I know, we all agree that the Bible holds the answers to our child-raising challenges.

Book Project on Raising Godly Kids

This is why I set out to write a book that encapsulated some of the best advice for raising godly girls in today’s world. I have a daughter and a son, but because my daughter is older, I thought I’d focus my research there.

I’ve interviewed several parents so far, and as you would expect, I’ve actually learned some tips that apply to both sexes.

There is a common thread among the parents I’ve interviewed, too.

And that is, we all tend to approach child-raising from the perspective of our own childhoods.

There may be some tweaks here and there.

For the most part, however, today’s parents tend to mirror their moderately “normal” childhoods. It is only in extreme situations and dysfunction do we see a major departure from our own parents’ child-raising styles.

For example:

If our parents spank, then we instituted corporal punishment (at least some version) as a form of discipline, too.

If our parents were diligent about teaching us the Bible or church attendance, then we also put an emphasis on the same as well.

If our parents tended to get angry and yell when they were upset, then, unfortunately, we will be more inclined to do the same with our own children.

You see the pattern.

No matter the good or the bad, it often gets passed down from generation to generation.

But, as a Jesus follower, it’s important we not base our parenting skills on experience alone.

That’s where the Bible is so critical to doing it the “right” way.

Notice that I didn’t say “perfect” way, because I don’t think there is necessarily a “perfect” way to raise a child.

But armed with scriptural references and a foundation based on pleasing God alone, I think we can get pretty close to perfection.

Planting Spiritual Seeds

The Bible references the planting of seeds, particularly the mustard seed (the smallest of all seeds) to suggest that something (in this case, faith) as small as an pen point can produce impressive outcomes.

When translating this metaphor to parenting, it holds a great deal of hope for us parents who trudge along, day in and day out, trying to raise our children the best way possible.

There was a 1950s movie called The Bad Seed about a little girl who was adopted.

Spoiler alert: The 8-year-old child killed another student and it was later revealed that her biological parent was a notorious serial killer. The storyline goes on to suggest that her murderous behavior was genetic and could not be reversed by “good parenting or a wholesome environment.”

I think Hollywood produced the movie to scare parents into subversively thinking that nothing can change a child.

Okaaaay. So maybe the intent wasn’t so sinister. Perhaps it was only meant to be a blockbuster of a psychological thriller.

Nonetheless, I want to let you know that according to my Bible, I beg to differ with the notion that a child (and an adult, for that matter) is incapable of change.

Generations were eternally re-directed because of Jesus Christ. Individuals whose ancestors believed in less inferior gods since the Old Testament, put away their ancestors’ beliefs and unrighteous behaviors when they put their trust in Jesus.

And so it is with you, dear parent.

It doesn’t matter what your past looked like.

What matters is the choice you make today — and every day, for that matter — in your decisions made regard to parenting.

Jesus told the parable of the mustard seed and that one’s faith as small as it can move mountains. That’s an incredible promise!

Faith & Parenting Go Hand-in-Hand

Where does your faith stand today?

If you believe godly parenting methods will produce “good fruit” down the road, no matter how small the effort, then it is your faith that brings that desire to fruition.

The Apostle Paul used another seed metaphor to describe how another person’s faith can grow.

I planted the seed, Apollos watered it, but God has been making it grow. 1 Corinthians 3:6 NIV

Indeed, it is ultimately God who will make the seeds we plant in our children right now, to grow.

As a parent, we have the opportunity to plant seeds. Every. Single. Day.

And according to the Bible, planting seeds in children can happen just about anywhere:

  • In the car,
  • at home,
  • while you’re making pancakes in the morning,
  • while you’re helping out with homework after school,
  • as you sit in the passenger seat as your teenager practices her driving skills,
  • on the way to Grandma’s house, and
  • before saying good night.

These commandments that I give you today are to be on your hearts. Impress them on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. Deuteronomy 6:6-8 NIV

To put something on your heart in Old Testament times, is similar to our modern version of taking something “to heart,” which means to commit to it with loyalty.

In other words, as parents, we are called to be committed to God’s Holy Scriptures and to teach them to our children, and to never give up on this endeavor.

If you keep at it, wisdom and moral principles in your children will prevail.

Three Primary Way to Grow Confident Kids

The Deuteronomy passage is specific enough, but here are some other practical ways to raise children who are confident in God, based on the Bible:

1. Pray for your children. Prayer takes faith, repetition and routine. Don’t give up on praying for your children, no matter how old they get or how wayward their lives may end up as adults, the prayers of the righteous are powerful and effective (James 5:16 NIV).

But when you pray, go into your room, close the door and pray to your Father, who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you. Matthew 6:6 NIV

2. Ask God for wisdom in raising your children. God raised the most perfect son who ever lived: Jesus! How much more equipped is He to help you raise your own child? Ask the Lord for guidance as you determine the best methods for instilling righteous values in your children, and He will give you everything you need.

If any of you lacks wisdom, you should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to you. But when you ask, you must believe and not doubt, because the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea, blown and tossed by the wind. That person should not expect to receive anything from the Lord. Such a person is double-minded and unstable in all they do. James 1:5-6 NIV

3. Seek advice from other godly parents.

The way of fools seems right to them, but the wise listen to advice. Proverbs 12:15 NIV

Plans are established by seeking advice; so if you wage war, obtain guidance. Proverbs 20:18 NIV

At times, it will feel like we are waging war with our own kids, under our own roof. But have no fear. Seek perspective from parents who’ve “been there, done that.” As I suggested earlier in this post, parents of children with older kids and even peers are a great source of advice. When you’ve gone through something already, you tend to have a better sense of how to avoid missteps and what you could’ve done better. And most parents are more than willing to help you avoid their mistakes if you simply ask.

4. Don’t withhold discipline from your children. Kids need routine and they need to be told what to do and what not to do. Discipline is necessary to raise confident children because it establishes boundaries. Contrary to what popular thinking says, boundaries are actually a good thing for children.

Keep in mind that it is important to discipline children out of love, not when you’re angry.

When it comes from a place of love, discipline also shows our children that we are concerned about their wellbeing and their character development. Without correction, children inevitably grow up with no clear sense of direction.

According to scholars, the Egyptian “Instructions of Ankhsheshonq,” a priest who was imprisoned and wrote a set of instructions to his young son, points out that “the children of fools wander in the streets, but the children of the wise are at their parents’ sides.”

I don’t know about you, but I’d rather be known as having children who are devoted to me and my husband and stick to our sides rather than those who “wander” the streets.

Whoever spares the rod hates their children, but the one who loves their children is careful to discipline them. Proverbs 13:24 NIV

5. Encourage their identity in Christ. Most children grow up with not necessarily a sense of their own identity in Christ. They lean more-so on their parent’s faith, rather than develop one of their own. To an extent, that’s okay and to be expected. But if we expect our faith will eventually “rub off” on them, then we are misguided and deceived.

It takes work to pour faith and righteous living into your children. It’s not something that just “happens.”

We can plant the seeds, however, by sharing how their identity is (or should be) rooted in Christ.

But you are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, God’s special possession, that you may declare the praises of him who called you out of darkness into his wonderful light.     1 Peter 2:9 NIV

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in the heavenly realms with every spiritual blessing in Christ. For he chose us in him before the creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight. Ephesians 1: 3-4 NIV

As obedient children, do not conform to the evil desires you had when you lived in ignorance. But just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do; for it is written: “Be holy, because I am holy.” 1 Peter 1:14-15 NIV

We are therefore Christ’s ambassadors, as though God were making his appeal through us. 2 Corinthians 5:20 NIV

Remind your children that they are different, and that being different is okay.

Tell them they are “chosen,” a royal priesthood, holy, God’s “special possession,” etc.

Show them that their identify is not rooted in this world, but rather is already established by the One who made the world and everything in it!

What’s your advice? How do you raise righteous children? Please share your tips and scriptures in the comments section below!

Bible Scriptures, Ministry

Devotional 9: God’s Grace to the Sinner & the Saint

The story of the prodigal son, which is found in Luke 15: 11-32, tells of a young man who squanders his inheritance through wild partying and reckless spending.

But after losing everything, he resorts to taking a job feeding pigs. He’s so poor when a famine hits that he steals chow from the pigs in order to quiet the rumblings in his own stomach.

Hitting rock bottom, the story indicates that this young man finally “came to his senses,” realizing that even the hired hands on his father’s farm were in a better position than he was in that moment.

He set out to go back to his father, and on his way plans what he will say to him: “Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son; make me like one of your hired servants.”

But before the young man could even get the words out, his father, seeing his son approaching in the distance, starts to sprint, embraces and welcomes his child home.

Imagine the look on his young son’s face when he felt his father’s arms wrap around his frail body.

The parable is such a beautiful metaphor for the redemption and reconciliation that awaits anyone who turns away from wrongdoing and seeks a relationship with God.

It serves as a great reminder that the almighty God always, always meets us where we are.

Anger after years of devotion

Meanwhile, in verses 25-32, the eldest son — the one who committed his life and made the choice to doing his father’s work — is fuming, becoming angrier as he witnessed his younger brother receiving the royal treatment.

I can just hear the disgruntlement begin to percolate.

Who does he think he is showing up after all this time?
He thinks he’s so special.
What about me? Look at everything I’ve done for Father!

The older son, like a petty child, refused to take part in the festivities to celebrate his little brother’s homecoming.

Seething, I’m sure, the Bible says he “refuses to go in.”

In another surprising act, the father leaves the party and goes outside to reason with the older son.

Bible scholars believe that ancient hearers might have expected the father to discipline the elder son; instead, the father listens to his son, and in a loving and understanding tone attempts to impart wisdom as the sounds of revelry reverberate in the background.

The elder son laments:

Look! All these years I’ve been slaving for you and never disobeyed your orders. Yet you never gave me even a young goat so I could celebrate with my friends. But when this son of yours who has squandered your property with prostitutes comes home, you kill the fattened calf for him!

Was the older son hurt? It sure sounds like it.

Was the older son bitter? You bet.

In his mind, he had devoted himself to doing what the father wanted, and wasn’t so much as thanked for his devotion. He believed he was entitled to the better treatment. He was superior, he thought. But, in fact, he was wrong.

The father, gracious and all-knowing, saw otherwise. Because the younger son was “dead and is alive again” and “lost and is found” this warranted a celebration.

The parable teaches us what is important to our Father in heaven — and that is, when a lost soul comes home. Commitment and devotion are pleasing in the Lord’s sight, too. But when our motives are self-centered, as is shown by the elder son,  this bothers God. And it should also bother us.

Which ‘son’ are you?

At times we are that lost child as is the prodigal son, the one who strays. The one who squanders everything. The one who then grovels back to God for forgiveness and reconciliation.

On the other hand, especially for those who’ve walked faithfully with the Lord for some time, it’s easy to follow the pattern of the elder son, who grew bitter, jealous and prideful after years of dedication.

Which one are you?

I believe the older son could have prevented his unrighteous response.

At least, I’d like to think he could.

And here’s how I believe those in ministry and in other leadership roles can avoid resentment while in service to others:

  • Be open about your shortcomings and confess your sins. No one is perfect. Not even the most devoted Christian. Routinely humble yourself before God, and a trusted spiritual mentor, as you examine your heart and actions. Romans 3:23 NIV says “for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” Moreover, no one “should claim to be without sin,” according to 1 John 1:8 NIV.
  • Show compassion. God is gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and abounding in love and faithfulness, according to 2 Chronicles 30:9 and Psalm 86:15. Throughout the Bible, God rescues and forgives his people when they turn back to Him. In the same way, Jesus showed compassion “when he saw the crowds… because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.” (Matthew 9:36 NIV) What this world absolutely needs from those who are faithful to God, is more compassion, more love and more grace. After all, that is what God showed us because “while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” (Romans 5:8 NIV)
  • Share your testimony and minister to others. If you’re a believer, then the Great Commission in Matthew 28:16-20 applies to you. We are called to baptize and to teach others. Holding a pastoral role, in whatever capacity in your local church, puts you in a position to regularly share how God has changed you and is currently shaping you. Don’t miss out on that opportunity by using your leadership role to talk only about how “great” your life is or what blessings God is bestowing on your life or barking orders about what other church members “need” to do. Rather, use it is a platform to elevate the love and mercy God extends to anyone who becomes a disciple of Jesus. Share your story. As a result, I pray, as the Apostle Paul writes in Philemon 6, that your partnership in the faith “may be effective in deepening your understanding of every good thing we share for the sake of Christ.”
  • Stop thinking you’re better than someone else. The Apostle Paul urges believers in Romans 12:3 (NIV): “Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgement, in accordance with the faith God has distributed to each of you.” He is referring in this passage to roles in the church, but the advice is appropriate for any situation. The statement could’ve certainly helped knock some sense into the elder brother in an ancient parable that continues to teach modern-day believers the value of right-sized thinking in times when all seems ….”unfair.”

Share your thoughts! How do you guard against disgruntlement, discontent and bitterness while serving in ministry or other leadership roles in and outside the church?

Bible Scriptures, Christian Lifestyle, Faith

Devotional 7: Does God Promise Us a ‘Good Life’?

The short answer is ‘no.’

God does not promise us a “good” life. But we can certainly offer Him a life that is “good,” by becoming a “living sacrifice, holy and pleasing” to Him, according to Romans 12:1.


There’s one important thing you learn in journalism school and that is balanced reporting.

A couple of weeks ago, I talked about answered prayers.

I shared how God was refining my character during a time of waiting, and how, eventually, God made a way for that prayer to be answered.

What I didn’t touch on is this: Your prayers won’t always get answered. And if they are answered, it may not be in the form you had hoped.

There’s a common misconception in the Christian community that God “wants” to bless us.

But is that true and, more importantly, is that biblical?

First of all, it’s important to distinguish what that word “bless” means. To one person it means material gain and to another it pertains to spiritual benefits, such as peace, eternal life with God, healing from past sin, comfort in times of trouble, etc.

That latter description would be more accurate.

Does God have plans to prosper you?

An often quoted scripture to espouse God’s desire for blessing is Jeremiah 29:11-14.

For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart. I will be found by you, declares the Lord, and will bring you back from captivity.

Taken out of context, this is a great feel-good scripture.

In America, we often make the mistake of translating this passage to mean we’ll get that bigger house and fancier car, or that we’ll rarely face a deadly sickness, or that we’ll land that next big career move, etc.

Thanks to the rampant “prosperity gospel” preached today, we are always at risk of applying scriptures to the superficial.

But, be assured of this, when God speaks He has something much bigger, more eternal, in mind: our salvation.

The Jeremiah promise can certainly be applied to modern-day believers, but it’s important to read the passage (or chapters) in its entirety.

The prophetic message was to the Israelites, God’s chosen people, who continuously wandered away from the truth and worshiped other gods.

The prophet Jeremiah was chosen by God to tell the Israelites how they were royally messing up in the eyes of the Lord, and to turn from their wrongdoing — immediately, or else.

Have you ever outright resisted God’s commands?

The people of Judah, one of the 12 tribes of Israel, whom Jeremiah is addressing in this passage, were an obstinate people, resisting God’s standard.

Still, the Lord cared for them. And God continually sent prophets to warn them when they forsook God in favor of a lesser, often handmade, deity.

Jeremiah described it best in chapter 25 verse 3:

For 23 years — from the thirteenth year of Josiah son of Amon King of Judah until this very day — the word of the Lord has come to me and I have spoken to you again and again, but you have not listened. And though the Lord has sent all his servants the prophets to you again and again, you have not listened or paid any attention. They said, “Turn now, each of you, from your evil ways and your evil practices, and you can stay in the land the Lord gave to you and your fathers for ever and ever. Do not follow other gods to serve and worship them; do not provoke me to anger with what your hands have made. Then I will not harm you.” (emphasis mine)

Did you catch the last part there?



God says to “turn,” “do not follow,” “do not provoke,” and “…then I will not harm you.”

There is a condition attached to God’s protection that is made clear in this passage before we even get to the promise that so many of us like to quote in Jeremiah 29.

What’s the lesson here?

Simply that, in order to apply Jeremiah 29: 11-14 (God’s protection from harm, spiritual prosperity and so on) to your present-day life, it’s imperative to also adhere to Jeremiah 25, which dictates a number of offenses on the part of the Israelites which we are susceptible to doing as well.

Therefore, if you want to slap the Jeremiah 29:11-14 bumper sticker to your life, go right ahead.

But be aware of the conditions, according to Jeremiah 25:

  1. Don’t ignore God. If you hear His voice, listen, pay attention and do what He says. Where do you “hear” God’s voice? In his Word, of course. The Holy Bible. Simply read it and apply it your life. While you’re at it, be careful not to cherry pick scriptures, but seek to understand a passage in context.
  2. Turn from your evil ways and practices. (For an overview of specific sins that can separate you from God’s protection, read Galatians 5: 19-21; Mark 7:20-22; Revelation 21:8; 2 Chronicles 33:6)
  3. Do not follow, serve or worship other gods. Other ‘gods’ include another lesser deity but it could mean yourself, a spouse/significant other, children, a celebrity, material possessions, profession/accolades, a t.v. show, etc. — anything or anyone that takes precedence in your life more than serving God.
  4. Do not provoke God to anger. Do a search for what may ‘provoke’ God and refer back to the scriptures on sins mentioned earlier. You’ll find that many acts in the Bible incited God’s anger, including casting spells, speaking to the dead, lack of worship, and sexual sins.

As the book of Jeremiah suggests, a “right” relationship with God — obedience to Him — must always precede any kind of blessing.

To live a “blessed” life, you can never go wrong by patterning your life after his son Jesus, who was without sin.

And that, my dear sisters, takes effort, not perfection.

What do you think? Have you ever experienced a time when repentance led to a spiritual or material blessing? Please share in the comments section below!

Bible Scriptures, Christian Lifestyle, Faith, Family, Inspiration

Devotional 4: Waiting on the Lord

In the morning, Lord, you hear my voice; in the morning I lay my requests before you and wait expectantly. Psalm 5:3 NIV

When you’re waiting for God to answer your prayers, do you doubt or have faith?

Three years ago, I sat on a friend’s living room sofa on the verge of tears.

I felt stuck. I wanted out.

More specifically, I was growing weary of living in a two-bedroom, one bath house in a rough part of the city.

I wanted something better for our young family. But “better” was taking too long to get here.

My dear friend listened as I lamented. She offered some encouragement.

While it didn’t make things better right away, the talk did help me gain some perspective. And it gave me a chance to off-load some things that were weighing on my heart.

The epiphany: My lack of faith

It was around that time that I realized I was failing to trust in the Lord.

It had been 7 years since we moved into that house, when we thought we’d only be there for two.

Somewhere along the way, I had lost my faith.

I started wondering if God didn’t want our family to move.

Is there something in my character that God wants to prune?, I thought.

Perhaps there’s someone here that he wants me to reach on His behalf, my mind wandered.

Or could it be that we’re just not ‘ready’ for that kind of blessing and responsibility? I asked quietly.

Over the next several months, I prayed. Studied the scriptures. And asked the Lord to show me where I was falling short.

He did, in fact, reveal some things that was darkening my heart and chipping away at my faith.

Once corrected, I saw the darkness lift.

My faith was restored.

Suddenly, I started to dream again.

Taking steps to receive the blessing.

With the Lord’s help, our family took steps that put us in a position to buy a new home.

But of all the things we did in preparation for the next stage, the most critical step was the clarifying moment when I repented of unbelief.

The writer of the book of Hebrews declared that:

“[W]ithout faith it is impossible to please God, because anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who earnestly seek him.” Hebrews 11:6 NIV

In reading the gospels, it was evident that people lacking faith displeased Jesus, and dare I say, even disgusted him?

See Matthew 8:26; Matthew 14:31 and Luke 12:28.

Therefore, dear friends, I pray that wherever you are in life, whatever struggle you currently face, that you have faith in the midst of the difficulty.

James 1:6 NIV puts it plainly:

But when you ask, you must believe and not doubt, because the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea, blown and tossed by the wind. That person should not expect to receive anything from the Lord. Such a person is double-minded and unstable in all they do.

I don’t share this story to claim that simply repenting can lead to material blessings. That would be misguided and unspiritual. I share this story to show that there is often a direct relation between our circumstance and our faith and obedience to God.

So, what happened in the end?

How does my story end, you ask?

Well, I’m sitting here in a new home that is more spacious and, for the most part, considerably safer. And I praise God for revealing my shortcoming and allowing a chance to change courses.

It only took about two years from the day I sat on my friend’s couch for God to deliver an outcome I had once thought was so far out of reach.

Lessons learned?

Wait “expectantly” for the Lord, as Psalm 5:3 suggests. Trust that He hears your prayers and wants to refine you, and not necessarily to withhold from you. Don’t doubt.

I wonder what God will do in your life two years from now? Where in your life do you need to replace doubt with faith?